The Laws of the Earliest English Kings

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1922 - History - 256 pages
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The most impressive contribution to the bibliography of Anglo-Saxon legal sources since Thorpe and Liebermann, this edition contains the texts of the Kentish laws, the laws of Ine and Alfred the Great, treaties with the Danes, and the laws of Edward the Elder and Aethelstan. The texts are in Anglo-Saxon with English translations. (Latin texts are used if the Anglo-Saxon originals were lost.) "Mr. Attenborough has done a very useful work in providing a critical translation of the Anglo-Saxon dooms for English-speaking students who are unable, or do not go far enough to find it needful, to make use of Liebermann's great and apparently final edition. Not that advanced scholars can afford to neglect Mr. Attenborough, for he shows himself fully capable of independent judgement and makes many observations deserving their attention": Frederick Pollock, Law Quarterly Review 38 (1922) 511.
 

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Contents

I
2
II
5
III
18
IV
24
V
33
VI
36
VII
62
VIII
95
XI
111
XII
114
XIII
118
XIV
122
XV
126
XVII
142
XVIII
146
XIX
152

IX
98
X
102
XX
156
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Page 2 - Qui inter cetera bona, quae genti suae consulendo conferebat, etiam decreta illi iudiciorum, iuxta exempla Romanorum, cum consilio sapientium constituit; quae conscripta Anglorum sermone hactenus habentur et obseruantur ab ea. In quibus primitus posuit, qualiter id emendare deberet, qui aliquid rerum uel ecclesiae uel episcopi uel reliquorum ordinum furto auferret: uolens scilicet tuitionem eis, quos et quorum doctrinam susceperat, praestare.
Page 15 - ... much of the spirit of affectionate romance. The men, however, cannot be called mercenary suitors, as they appear to have been the paymasters. These contracts give occasion to the Saxon legislators to express the fact of treating for a marriage by the terms of buying a wife. Hence our oldest law says, if a man buys a maiden, the bargain shall stand if there be no deceit; otherwise, she should be restored to her home, and his money shall be returned to him.

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